GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW

LABOR LAW 256

SPRING 2000

GENERAL INFORMATION

Mr. Stephen Forman

A. COURSE OBJECTIVE

I believe that labor law is one of the most exciting, dynamic and interesting fields of legal practice. My objective is to convey those feelings to class participants and to present, in an interesting and understandable manner, the current state of the law of union and management relations under the National Labor Relations Act.

B. SCOPE AND ORGANIZATION OF THE COURSE

The course will include protection of employees’ right to organize, the process for obtaining representation rights, collective bargaining, arbitration, economic action, administration of the collective bargaining agreement, successorship, preemption of state law, the right to fair representation and discipline of union members. A Schedule of the course topics and required reading is attached. The Schedule is a guide and we may need to make small deviations as the course proceeds.

C. CLASS PREPARATION AND MATERIALS

Please read the textbook materials and the cases listed in the Schedule and be prepared to discuss them in class. The textbook is Labor Law (12th ed. 1996), by A. Cox, D. Bok, R. Gorman and M. Finkin. The Developing Labor Law (3rd ed. 1992 and 1997 Cumulative Supplement), authored by the Section of Labor and Employment Law of the American Bar Association and published by the Bureau of National Affairs, is a comprehensive and well organized treatise and is used by most labor law practitioners. How Arbitration Works (4th ed. 1985 and 1985-89 Cumulative Supplement), by F. Elkouri and E. Elkouri, is a comprehensive treatise on arbitration. Labor law research is done primarily in either or both of two reporting systems. One is the Labor Relations Reporter, published by the Bureau of National Affairs (BNA), and the other is Labor Relations Law, published by Commerce Clearing House (CCH).

D. GRADING POLICY

The final exam will be the primary factor in determining your grade. However, the quality of your participation in class (which encompasses attendance, the demonstration of thoughtful preparation and the clear presentation of the relevant issues) will be used to adjust your grade up or down to the nearest allowable grade under the law school’s grading system.

E. OFFICE HOURS

During the day I can be reached at the Arent Fox law firm. My direct telephone line is (202) 857-6248. Please feel free to call and to leave a message on my voice-mail if I do not answer. My e-mail address is <formans@arentfox.com> I normally do not have access to my e-mail on weekends or holidays. I will be available at the law school most class days an hour before class begins. If you need to schedule a special time to see me, give me a call and we can arrange it.

In addition to learning something about the practice of labor law I want you to enjoy the course.