Mason Law

In The News
A compilation of news stories about the Mason Law community


A snapshot of selected APRIL 2013 news and activities:

IN THE HEADLINES

The Economist
Gun buy-back programs, which seem to have proliferated since the Newtown shootings, may result in the exchange of some weapons for relatively small sums of money, but critics question their overall effectiveness.
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U.S. News & World Report
Commenting on the detention and questioning of a suspected Boston Marathon bomber, Professor Nathan Sales credits the government for using its "high-value detainee interrogation group" for questioning but expresses his concern that interrogation may have concluded prematurely.
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Bloomberg
As more than half of publicly listed U.S. companies hold annual meetings between now and June, two small firms will have an inordinate impact on how votes are cast, according to Professor J.W. Verret.
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Harvard Health Policy Review
From the point of view of Professor Ilya Somin, The Supreme Court's decisions in the historic NFIB v. Sebelius case concerning provisions of the Affordable Care Act constitutes one of the most important federalism rulings in modern history, and one that has important implications for the future.
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Reuters
A paper co-written by Professor David Schleicher was cited in a Reuters news article examining whether mayoral candidates can tackle New York City's most urgent issues.
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ABA Journal
Professor Ilya Somin, one of the authors of a federalism amicus brief in United States v. Windsor, takes issue with suggestions that a decision on states' rights grounds in the case could become a "constitutional trojan horse," protecting same-sex married couples in the nine states currently allowing gay marriage while depriving those in other states of the same status.
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Wall Street Journal
In a Wall Street Journal op-ed, Professor Nelson Lund takes the position that "one advantage of democracy is that it allows failed experiments to be abandoned. If the Supreme Court constitutionalizes a right to same-sex marriage, however, there will be no going back. The court cannot possibly know that it is safe to take this irrevocable step."
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