Mason Law

In The News
A compilation of news stories about the Mason Law community


A snapshot of selected JULY/AUGUST 2013 news and activities:

IN THE HEADLINES

Wall Street Journal
Despite the obstacles inherent in attempts to sue the government, Professor Ilya Somin cautions in the Wall Street Journal's Law Blog that the president still has an obligation to act within his constitutional authority.
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Reuters
A Reuters columnist draws from Professor David Schleicher's research in an article dealing with New York City's housing crisis, where demand outstrips supply by a wide margin, driving the cost of housing upward.
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Washington Post
Professor Helen Alvaré
is quoted in a Washington Post article that considers signals by Pope Francis that the role of women within the Catholic Church and society requires change.
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Arizona Capitol Times
Commenting on an analysis of federal campaign data showing Arizonans are more likely to give to someone they know than to a party or PAC, Professor Ilya Somin says spreading the wealth beyond the politicians alone is probably a good thing for voters.
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Washington Post
In the view of Mason Law Dean Daniel Polsby, proposals by the American Bar Association (ABA) that loosen accreditation rules for full-time faculty could prove valuable to law schools.
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USA Today
In a column appearing in USA Today, Professor Ilya Somin argues that the use of eminent domain to condemn hundreds of mortgages in Richmond, California, makes no sense and may actually harm consumers in the long run.
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Virginia Law Review In Brief
An essay by Professor Neomi Rao examines the unusual right to recognition in United States v. Windsor and explains how such dignity rights have a problematic relationship to individual rights and to the structural protections of federalism.
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U.S. News & World Report
Technology, not law, may be the best way to prevent leaks of classified information writes Professor Nathan Sales in an op-ed appearing in U.S. News & World Report.
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abcNEWS
A controversial plan in Richmond, California, to seize mortgages for financially distressed properties using the legal process of eminent domain is “likely to be permissible” after the Kelo case, says Professor Ilya Somin in an abcNEWS article, but under-compensation will be a “possible constitutional problem.”
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International Business Times News
In an International Business Times News article, Professor Nathan Sales comments on data collection, saying that for a grand jury to acquire information, "there has to be some plausible nexus between the information you seek, the subject of the information you seek, and the subject of your investigation. Relevance is a concept that measures the connection between two different data sets. You can't go on a fishing expedition."
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Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Professor Thomas Hazlett's research showing some rural telephone companies were receiving very large subsidies was cited in a Honolulu Star-Advertiser article about the efforts of a Honolulu-based phone company's scramble to cut costs and find new sources of revenue subsequent to the FCC's decision to cap the amount of USF subsidies telecommunications companies can claim for serving "high cost" areas.
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Richmond Times-Dispatch
The author of a Richmond Times Dispatch op-ed examining common threads in stories about the Virginia governor's scandals, actions of the two men running against him, the Detroit bankruptcy, and the president's recent economic speech cited comments by Professor Ilya Somin in his article.
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New York Times
Calling the European Union's proposal to cap interchange fees on credit and debit card purchases "an unqualified disaster for consumers," Professor Todd Zywicki countered arguments that lower fees would benefit consumers with lower prices.
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USA TODAY
In an op-ed appearing in USA TODAY, Professor Ilya Somin writes that Constitutional restrictions on federal authority exist to protect our lives, liberty, and property against the power of the government; but if we want to enforce constitutional limits on government, we cannot rely on judges to do the job alone.
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New York Times
Writing in the New York Times Room for Debate in response to the question "How can the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau have the strongest and most immediate impact?", Professor Todd Zywicki warns that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau must avoid two crucial errors in order to fulfill its promise to promote consumer protection and fair competition.
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National Post
In an op-ed appearing in Canada's National Post, Professor F.H. Buckley makes the case that despite a similar inheritance of British traditions and institutions, differences in civil procedure law between the U.S. and Canada are substantial, with Canada deriving the greater benefit.
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Slate, New York Times
Writers in two major publications cited research by Professor David Schleicher in making their cases.
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Wall Street Journal
A government plan designed to subsidize phone lines in remote areas is, in the words of Professor Thomas Hazlett, "a failed government initiative that taxes urban phone users."
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Zócalo Public Square
In a Zócalo Public Square online forum, Up For Discussion: The Next Big Question For Marriage, Professor Neomi Rao and other legal experts define what is in their views the biggest unresolved legal question after the recent U.S. Supreme Court marriage decisions.
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FACULTY ACTIVITIES

OF INTEREST

 

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