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Mason Law Professors Remember Justice Antonin Scalia

Professors Michael Krauss, Ilya Somin, and Helen Alvaré discussed the loss of Justice Antonin Scalia and his impact on American legal thought. Justice Scalia passed away on February 13 at the age of 79.

Supreme Court of the United States
Supreme Court of the United States

Krauss described Justice Scalia as “a man who has changed this country tremendously and for the better.” Krauss wrote in a contribution to Forbes, “Justice Antonin Scalia’s memory will live on, and will be for a blessing to all Americans who care about the Rule of Law.”

Commenting on Justice Scalia’s influence as a Supreme Court Justice, Somin said in POLITICO Magazine, “His most significant contribution was his powerful defense of originalism in constitutional theory and textualism in statutory interpretation. When he was first appointed to the court, most judges and legal scholars tended to ignore the original meaning of the Constitution, and often assumed that legislative history was a more important guide to the meaning of a law than actual wording of the law itself. Scalia helped change that. Today, both textualism and originalism enjoy widespread acceptance.”

In a commentary piece for Crux, Alvaré wrote, “Justice Scalia was a man blessed with an extraordinary mind and education, but who insisted on remembering that the law comes from the bottom up, from the people, and not from the top down.”

RIP Justice Antonin Scalia, Forbes, February 13, 2016. By Michael I. Krauss.

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How Antonin Scalia changed America, POLITICO Magazine, February 14, 2016.

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Justice Scalia let the people speak in his opinions, Crux, February 21, 2016. By Helen M. Alvaré.

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